How to Measure QA Success

The benefits of quality assurance testing in software are widely accepted, but quantifying those benefits and optimizing performance can be tricky. Software developer performance can be measured by the amount and difficulty of code that they commit in a given sprint, but measuring the performance of QA engineers is harder when their success is measured by the lack of problems in software applications deployed into production. In this post, we will look at some common techniques for measuring the effectiveness of your QA team, as well as how to measure the return on investment for automation and tooling.

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5 Common Problems Found On QA Teams

Quality assurance testing is an important part of software development, particularly as projects grow in size and complexity. After all, a bug that goes unnoticed will become progressively more expensive to fix over time and could cause significant usability issues before being patched. Effective QA teams can preemptively find and help eliminate bugs before they reach production servers to reduce development costs and ensure an optimal user experience. In this article, we will look at some common problems that tend to arise when implementing QA processes and how to overcome them.

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Communication 101: Bringing your QA Results to the Broader Team

Communication is one of the most under appreciated skills for software development teams, but it can mean the difference between success and failure. There is nowhere this is more apparent in most organizations than communication between QA and developers. Often times, developers work on features independently of QA, throw the code ‘over the wall’, and only hear back from QA when a bug is found that needs to be fixed.

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The Smart Way to Test Notifications

The Problem With Notifications Any experienced QA team will tell you: the hardest thing to test is normally notifications, for a seemingly inexhaustible list of reasons. The primary one being that even though the notifications go out through email, you’re often stopped from sending said email. That’s because you can’t actually send a notification, as you don’t want users to receive something that’s not actually worth sending yet or which hasn’t been debugged.

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Who Is Responsible for Improving QA Test Workflows?

Nearly everyone agrees that QA test workflows are imperfect when they’re written. That’s because it’s impossible to foresee every use case for the workflow and to ensure that it will continue to work after dozens of updates to that section of the codebase. This is especially true in the world of email testing, where emails are constantly getting updated, rebranded, refreshed, and analyzed. So, it’s no surprise that there’s a need for someone to be responsible for the ownership of the QA test workflow.

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How You Know When You Need to Automate Your QA Tests

It’s a question that has beguiled an endless list of QA teams: should I automate this test? It’s not that there’s a preference in one direction or the other, it’s just that with an engineering mindset comes the desire to do the more efficient, practical thing. Sometimes that means automating a QA test, while other times it means continuing to manually perform the QA test yourself. We’re not going to pretend that we have the answer for every single software team out there.

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The Need for Easy-to-Use Test SMTP Servers

SMTP servers are something we all rely on, but something that none of us really want to spend a lot of time thinking about. As a result, we end up not realizing that while there is a real need for test SMTP servers that are easy-to-use in a QA environment, there is a general lack of easily testable SMTP servers. We all know the need for SMTP servers, but we don’t think about how we’re going to perform QA tests using these servers.

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Sign-Up and Onboarding Flows

Onboarding is one of the most under-appreciated parts of every software application. For those that don’t know the terminology, this refers to everything from when a user first encounters your product all the way through to when they are a fully-active user of your service. It’s a broad definition, but it encompasses quite a big part of using your software. Now, for a typical software company, the onboarding process is actively developed early on in the life of the company.

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